Severe flooding in Indonesia hurts suppliers, employees of Japanese-invested companies

09, Jan. 2020

A man walking in flood waters in Kampung Pulo Area, eastern Jakarta on Jan. 2, 2020. (Photo courtesy of ANTARA)
A man walking in flood waters in Kampung Pulo Area, eastern Jakarta on Jan. 2, 2020. (Photo courtesy of ANTARA)

By Anita Fildzah

JAKARTA, NNA – Severe, deadly flooding last week in the greater Jakarta area damaged multiple manufacturers, some Japanese-invested, and caused operations to stop.

Flood waters in spots such as Jakarta, West Java and Banten provinces on Jan. 1 and 2 brought water damage to some factories while hobbling the supply chains of others, according to statements from the affected businesses.

PT Toyota Motor Manufacturing Indonesia, a local arm of Toyota Motor Corp., reported that car production in West Java was disrupted because of delays in getting goods from suppliers that blocked by floodwaters. The factories, however, are running as usual, company general manager Teguh Trihono told NNA Wednesday.

PT Honda Prospect Motor, assembler of Honda cars and components, also said some suppliers had been hobbled. The company had sped up deliveries before the flood as a precaution, public relations manager Yulian Karfili told NNA Wednesday.

Furukawa Electric Co. said in a news release its subsidiary headquarters, PT Tembaga Mulia Semanan in West Jakarta, was damaged by flooding and had quit operating. The company that makes copper and aluminum products is looking for alternative ways to produce.

Officers inspect vehicles that sank in flood waters Cikampek Toll Road around Jatibening, Bekasi Regency, West Java Province on Jan. 1, 2020. (Photo courtesy of ANTARA)
Officers inspect vehicles that sank in flood waters Cikampek Toll Road around Jatibening, Bekasi Regency, West Java Province on Jan. 1, 2020. (Photo courtesy of ANTARA)

Employees at some factories also had trouble getting to work because of flooding near their houses or along their commute routes.

"There are some of PT Suzuki Indonesia Sales employees that affected by flood, but that does not disrupt the company's overall activities,” said Rudiansyah, the public relations head of the Japanese automaker’s Indonesian distributor. “In parallel, we have also helped affected employees.”

Normal operations were not hurt, the company said. Mitsubishi Motors Corp. in Indonesia also saw little operational impact, Prianto, human resources and general affair director, said, noting a backup plan in case of floods.

The greater Jakarta area, much of which sits below sea level, frequently floods in the first months of the year. At least 67 people died and 36,419 fled their homes in the first week of the month, according to National Disaster Management Agency figures.