4 Japanese firms to conduct hydrogen supply chain study in Australia

16, Sep. 2021

Image shows a rendering of hydrogen production facilities envisaged under a project by six Japanese and Australian companies in the Aldoga district of Queensland State in Australia. (Photo courtesy of Iwatani Corp.)
Image shows a rendering of hydrogen production facilities envisaged under a project by six Japanese and Australian companies in the Aldoga district of Queensland State in Australia. (Photo courtesy of Iwatani Corp.)

SYDNEY, NNA - Liquefied hydrogen supplier Iwatani Corp. and three other Japanese firms will partner with two Australian companies to carry out a feasibility study for a green liquefied hydrogen supply chain project in the state of Queensland.

Iwatani, Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Kansai Electric Power Co. and major trading firm Marubeni Corp. signed a memorandum of understanding with two local energy infrastructure companies -- Stanwell Corporation Ltd. and APT Management Services Pty Ltd. -- on Wednesday to conduct the feasibility study.

The six parties said the Central Queensland hydrogen project calls for mass producing hydrogen using renewable energy and liquefying it at Gladstone Port in Queensland and exporting the liquefied hydrogen to Japan.

The six parties aim to produce more than 100 tons of hydrogen per day around 2026 and raise daily output to 800 tons from 2031.

The project follows a concept study on the production of green liquefied hydrogen and its export to Japan by Iwatani and Stanwell, an electric power firm owned by the Queensland government, from 2019 to 2020.

Iwatani will operate as the Japanese-side coordinator, Kawasaki Heavy will study hydrogen liquefaction and loading terminals, Kansai Electric will provide information on hydrogen's potential utilization and Marubeni will study a commercialization model.

Stanwell will coordinate overall project development while APT Management will be responsible for advising on the construction of hydrogen pipelines and hydrogen production plants and overall infrastructure including electricity and water.

The project participants anticipate an expansion of renewable energy generation such as solar power because Australia's northernmost state enjoys favorable weather conditions for more than 300 days a year, lowering hydrogen production costs in the long run.(NNA/Kyodo)