Myanmar Services

Construction machine lease firm Kinan to train operators in Myanmar

24, Oct. 2019

A new office building of Myanmar Kinan Co., including a training facility, is under construction in the Thilawa Special Economic Zone on the outskirts of the commercial capital Yangon, Myanmar, on Oct. 19, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Myanmar Kinan)
A new office building of Myanmar Kinan Co., including a training facility, is under construction in the Thilawa Special Economic Zone on the outskirts of the commercial capital Yangon, Myanmar, on Oct. 19, 2019. (Photo courtesy of Myanmar Kinan)

YANGON, NNA - Japanese construction machinery leasing firm Kinan Corp. will launch a full-fledged training business for operators in Myanmar to utilize its inactive machines in the off-season.

Myanmar Kinan Co., the local arm of the Japanese company based in Wakayama Prefecture, will commercialize its training program formerly conducted for client construction firms and factories.

A new training facility for up to 100 trainees will open inside its office building under construction in the Thilawa Special Economic Zone on the outskirts of the commercial capital Yangon next Tuesday, according to the company.

The company will also start a two-year program next year to train instructors in bulldozer and excavator operations at Myanmar's Ministry of Construction, under a program of the Japan International Cooperation Agency, Tokyo’s development aid arm.

“Every year in the rainy season from June to September, operating rates decrease due to decrease in construction,” Hirofumi Nakazato, managing director of Myanmar Kinan, told NNA earlier in October. He said the training business will optimize the use of its machines and employees.

“In the future, we want to help create standards for operators with the government of Myanmar to ensure security and quality on site,” he said, after saying that deficiencies in the qualification system are causing accidents in the country.

Established in December 2015, Myanmar Kinan has four bases in the country, owning around 1,000 construction machines of some 130 types. (NNA/Kyodo)